Daoism and Confucianism Vocab

Analects:

A book of the sayings attributed to Confucius and his early disciples.

Dao:

The mysterious origin of the universe, which is present and visible in everything.

Daodejing:

The classic scripture of Daoism.

Five Classics:

The classical literature of the time preceding Confucius, including poetry, history, and divination.

Four Books:

The major Confucian books, which include the sayings of Confucius and Mencius.

Junzi:

“Noble person”; the refined human ideal of Confucianism.

Laozi:

The legendary founder of Daoism.

Legalists:

The strictest of the Chinese philosophical schools, which advocate strong laws and punishments.

Li:

Appropriate action, ritual, propriety, etiquette.

Qi:

The life force.

Ren:

Empathy, consideration for others, humaneness; a Confucian virtue.

Shu:

Reciprocity; a Confucian virtue.

Wen:

Cultural refinement; a Confucian virtue.

Wu Wei:

“No action,” “no strain,” “effortlessness”; doing only what comes spontaneously and naturally.

Xiao:

Family devotion, filial piety; a Confucian virtue.

Yang:

The active aspect of reality that expresses itself in speech, light, and heat.

Yijing:

An ancient Confucian book of divination, one of the Five Classics, still in use today.

Yin:

The receptive aspect of the universe that expresses itself in silence, darkness, coolness, and rest.

Zhuangzi:

Author of the Zhuangzi, a book of whimsical stories that express themes of early Daoist thought.

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